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Montana State Bobcats elevate Matt Miller to offensive coordinator

Posted at 11:54 AM, Oct 22, 2018
and last updated 2018-10-22 20:30:14-04

BOZEMAN – Jeff Choate announced Monday that he has elevated third-year receivers coach Matt Miller to offensive coordinator and primary play-caller.

“Matt is an excellent football coach who has earned this opportunity,” Choate said. “Our offensive production needs to increase, and this is an effort to align our scheme and personnel in a way that we hope accomplishes that goal.”

Choate indicated that Brian Armstrong will continue to coach Bobcat tight ends and aid in constructing the team’s run game. Miller will also coach quarterbacks with the departure of Bob Cole, who had held that role since last spring.

While Choate said it wasn’t an emotional decision, the move comes on the heels of another inconsistent showing from the Montana State offense. The Bobcats had just seven first downs in their 34-24 loss at Weber State on Saturday. They rushed for 168 yards on 34 carries but only completed nine of 23 pass attempts. MSU totaled 53 passing yards with no touchdowns and two interceptions.

Montana State ranks sixth in the Big Sky Conference in scoring offense at 27.9 points per game, but the Bobcats are 12th in total offense, accumulating 339.7 yards per game. Only Weber State (266.3 yards per game) is worse. Idaho State leads the league with 543.6 yards per game.

Cole joined MSU’s staff in January of 2017 as the Bobcats’ quarterbacks coach and pass game coordinator. Armstrong came to Montana State in 2016 and was elevated to offensive coordinator prior to the 2017 season.

Miller is in his third season on the staff at MSU and has coached the wide receivers since his arrival. Miller, a Helena Capital High School graduate, is one of the most decorated football players in Montana high school history. He was the Montana Gatorade player of the year in 2009 and continued his playing career at Boise State, where he set the program record for career receptions (244).

(Editor’s note: Portions of a Montana State University media release were used in this report)